Posted by: Scott | Friday, August 4, 2006

Commission Candidates Questioned

Northfork Citizens for Responsible Development has recently completed results from a questionnaire submitted to the candidates for the Park County Commission.

North Fork Citizens Query County Candidates on Growth

North Fork Citizens for Responsible Development has completed an educational questionnaire of candidates running for seats on the Park County Board of County Commissioners.

The group asked the candidates a number of growth-related questions. A letter with the questions was sent out on June 16th with a response requested by July 10th.

Malcolm Adams and Dennis Decker issued statements. In addition to answering the questions, Michael McCue, Jill Shockley Siggins, and Klodette Stroh also made statements.

Tim French was the only candidate that did not respond to the questionnaire.

The statements are listed first. The questions are below them, followed by the responses. Candidates are listed in alphabetical order by last name, irrespective of the term they are running for or party affiliation.

Statement from Malcolm Adams – Rather than answer your questions directly I will present my thoughts as to future Park County growth and development.
I feel that future County development should be done in such a way that the planning and zoning board present strong recommendations for the County Commissioners to finalize. Development should occur in such a way that every land owner’s property appreciates in value after the development and we must realize increase land values to help the county tax structure.
Major, Minor and Simple subdivisions regulations are needed and should be reviewed every two years at maximum as future growth in Park County is regulated and covenants are in place when needed. We must protect the land owners or his or her property values. Park County is a beautiful place to live and raise children. Growth is inevitable in Park County Wyoming and the Park County Commissioners have a responsibility to police this growth and keep all landowners happy because their land is gaining in value.
Planning, Zoning Regulations and Compliance are items needed for good growth and a wonderful place to live for
all.

Statement from Dennis Decker – To answer your questions in a nutshell, allow me to give my vision of the county commission. First and foremost, I believe that the commission needs to be proactive rather than reactive in setting the guidelines for the governing of our county. We have to collectively come to a vision of who we are, and then develop a vision of what we want to be. I believe the planning office should be the best staffed office in the county. I believe the P&Z should have the brightest minds available appointed to it, then backed by the commission. We as a county need to have a long term framework in place to direct all development. This framework needs to be a living document, revisited on a regular basis.
I am not foolish to represent myself as having all the answers to all the problems in the county, but I do have a level head and a good mind in that head. I have been through some tough issues as a Trustee of Park County School District #1, and I very well understand the process of information dissemination and decision making. I believe that if we can use the resources available to us we can find solutions acceptable to those on either side of a question.
I have not been involved historically with Copperleaf, other than what I have read in the papers, so therefore do not wish to represent myself as an informed decision maker on this issue. I am a quick learner, and I will give my whole effort to this question and every other that will come my way if elected to the county commission.

Statement from Michael McCue – Thank you for your interest in my position on growth-related issues in Park County. Before getting to your questions please let me tell you a bit about my background.
I am a 3rd generation Wyoming native. I was raised on the Southfork and continue to live there today. I retired last year after 39 years as a professional pilot. As a Captain for a major airline, I was able to commute to my job around the world yet continue to live on this beautiful river. I have seen the results of poorly managed growth in many other areas and lived with the incredible growth of the last 45 years on the Southfork. This background has helped me form my positions on growth-related issues faced by Park County.

Statement from Jill Shockley Siggins – I would like to take this opportunity to respectfully request your consideration for my candidacy for Park County Commissioner. I had the honor of serving on the commission in 1992-1996. Family considerations resulted in my not seeking a second term. Seeking a second term as your commissioner is my foremost desire.
I am responding to five questions received regarding my position relating to a number of issues in your planning area. While I hesitate to provide insight into my position on these complicated issues in a written format I believe your group deserves to be heard and receive a response. I would welcome the opportunity to interact with your organization to further discuss and qualify my positions.
. . . . I hope these brief thoughts will be of some help to your organization. Please be assure if I am elected as your County Commissioner I will be available and will seek input and council on the ever-changing issues we will face today and tomorrow. I believe my campaign motto “ Together We Can” expresses my desire to be inclusive in seeking ideas and expertise in keeping our communities healthy and beautiful. I sought council and expertise when I was in office before and I will do so again if elected.

Statement from Klodette Stroh – Your letter of June 16th, 2006 touched my heart and I am very concerned about land development in Park County. I admire the people of the North Fork for organizing a committee and bringing their thoughts together about their environment and their neighborhood. In your letter you asked five questions from me and I will try my best to answer them. Please keep in mind that most of my background information regarding this issue is from what I have gathered from the newspaper articles (Cody Enterprise and Powell Tribune) and your letter.

Question 1- Our group presented a petition to the County that they conduct a build-out study of the North Fork. The County Commissioners decided to not conduct such a study. Should the County conduct such a study of the North Fork?

Bill Brewer – Yes, but it should be for all of Park County.

Kim Capron – I do not have a working knowledge of build-out studies, but from the information I’ve gathered it looks to me like a process that would be valuable for not just the North Fork, but all of Park County.

F. W. Child – I would need more information on the costs and other details of such a study.

Ed Farmer – I think the county commission did the prudent thing by not spending tax-payer dollars for a study, and they are completely within their right legally to deny such a request. They represent the entire county not just the interests of those citizens on the North Fork. I realize this issue is very important to you, but it’s importance to the whole of Park County is the factor that should be used to make any determination when the tax-payer is ultimately the one that pays for frivolous studies. It has been my experience that all a “study” does is waste time and money. That upsets me!

Marie Fontaine – I think the build-out study could be beneficial and used as a tool in recognizing how lacking our current regulations might be. I would support using it as a tool.

Terry Hinkle – Yes. A build-out study would allow county officials and citizens to visualize the impact of future development on the North Fork Community, helping officials to prudently plan for future infrastructure needs and determine the true “carrying capacity” of the land.
It is my understanding that Wyoming’s Game and Fish Department is in the process of conducting a build-out study of the “front-range” in this region. Park County officials should participate and cooperate in this project.

Michael McCue – No, putting approval of major and simple subdivisions on hold should be done on a case-by-case basis. To hold up a subdivision that has gone completely through the process because the Assistant Planner quits would be a bit excessive. Common sense should be used. Yes, we really need a County Engineer and County Planning office.

Max Mulford – I do feel that a Planner and Engineer are needed by the county. The county also needs a compliance or enforcement officer for building and zoning issues. The former Planner clearly and openly stated that enforcement was the last thing for his department to do. Clearly many issues would have been solved by enforcement and clearly states rules and regulations.

Jill Shockley Siggins
– Moratoriums are done only in the case of an emergency. The planning and zoning staff is under the direction of the Country Commissioners. When staff leaves the employment of Park County the board is bound to seek legal council and this is usually sought from the County Attorneys Office. (At times outside council has been sought.) Your question can be answered with a question. If Park County can save revenue by incorporating the planning office into the office of the County Attorney would you support this change? I believe the public would say no. Attorneys have the ability to see if a request has met all of the legal criteria while a planner works with citizens through a process to implement planning criteria through effective planning methodologies. Often the County Engineers office is called upon for the review of subdivision roads, irrigation systems etc. in the planning processes. The landscapes across Park County deserve to have the best minds available in dealing with current and future land use issues.

Klodette Stroh
– Park County citizens have employed experts to assist Park County Commissioners to make wise, beneficial decisions, which effects tax paying citizens who are keeping our schools, hospitals and our neighborhood functional. I have always relied on conducting research, studying background information and looking at every angle as well as considering people’s concerns and advise. I don’t understand how the county was able to approve subdivisions without consulting experts such as County Planner and County Engineer. I would declare a moratorium in absence of information resources. I believe in making a beneficial and accurate decision to serve my people and also alleviate future conflicts that may arise from uneducated decision making.
As you mentioned in your letter, Park County citizens pay for County Planning Office and a County Engineer for their expert advice, and they play a vital role.

Jim Vanaman – Yes, we need a county planning office and county engineer. We probably should have declared a moratorium on major subdivisions, we need that input from the experts.

Tom Whitson – The county has continued to function in the absence of key personnel including a planner, assistant planner and county engineer. The assistant county attorney has provided excellent assistance and advice during this time and is already a member of the planning team. While an effective planning team is essential, all business cannot stop until the team is fully in place.

Question 2 – In January 2005, our group made a presentation to the P&Z board requesting a number of changes to the zoning resolution and subdivision regulations. The County still has not acted on these changes. Nor has the County made changes to the resolution or regulations although such changes have been under study for years. Should our land use and zoning regulations be changed? If so, do you have any particular changes you would like to make?

Bill Brewer – I can[‘t] really comment on that right now. I need more information on how it is written now.

Kim Capron – I do think our land use and zoning regulations are in need of a complete overhaul and I have no doubt that changes will be the order of the day. I do think, however, that we should proceed with a comprehensive county-wide plan led by a qualified county planner who can facilitate the process professionally. As a county commissioner I would be hesitant to begin changing pieces and parts of our county’s zoning regulations without thoroughly understanding the effects those changes would make county-wide. I think the worst thing we could do right now is begin a shot-gun approach to randomly changing the land use and zoning regulations without a comprehensive plan in place. We need the big picture and we need it now. I feel this is a priority for our county.

F. W. Child – Zoning should be fair and equitable. I don’t have any specific changes, but this is something that should be looked at and done in a timely matter.
Is it a good idea to put a group of older people up the North Fork [referring to Coppeleaf] if they can’t get the services they need if there was an emergency situation? The tunnels could be blocked for three or four months if there was a tanker wreck there.

Ed Farmer
– Once again I do not think that one group of individuals should try to dictate any changes. Granted the county should have issued an opinion before now, but any change should be a tax-payer/voter issue. The place to institute change is through a lobby effort at the state legislature. You cannot expect change for the whole based on an issue that will not impact the entire county.

Marie Fontaine – Currently, changes are being made to the Subdivision Regulations in preparation for a Public Hearing. However, I think it might be a good idea to start with the Zoning Resolution as I see it as the basis for much of what is in the Subdivision Regulations. I also think it would be helpful to have an Advisory Committee made up of individuals from the various areas of the County. I have a couple of areas of concern; one are simple subdivisions as their minimal requirements which will create problems in the future; secondly, is to look at &/or consider growth management.

Terry Hinkle – Zoning regulations are general determinations about land use and maximum density that are meant to provide a health, safety and welfare benefit to the citizens. They give predictability to residents and developers alike regarding the future of a community. The Park County zoning regulations were adopted after a lengthy, painstaking process that involved much citizen input. Any changes to the current regulations should reflect the particular concerns of the affected community and there are provisions in the law to accomplish this.

Michael McCue – Yes, that was easy. Unfortunately, what changes we make will not be that easy. As a commissioner, one needs to look at the needs and interests of the overall county as well as the residents of one particular area. On the Northfork, for example there are a number of different constituencies besides your group. The views on whether there should be change and if so what the nature of the changes should be are diverse. Your group seems to have a broad based group of landowners with good leadership and strong advocacy. In addition to the folks who live in the valley the entire Park County citizenry, view the Northfork as a special place. I find that they too believe the Commissioners should protect the beauty with thoughtful management of the persistent growth. With the problem of the divergent views of the public and conflicting even combative Wapiti Valley property interests a wise commissioner will be compelled to do several things;

A. Develop a sizable budget authorization to fund Planning and Zoning.
B. Hire a knowledgeable experienced County Planner and adequate staff.
C. Conduct a broad based study of the development trends and pressures in each of the areas of the County where reanalysis is appropriate.
D. Conduct public hearing to get input from those property owners to be affected and the public at large.
E. Write a plan based on the information gained through studies, public input and sound judgment about what is in the best interest of the County.
F. Present the proposed plan and regulations to the landowners of the various areas and the general public at public meetings through out the County. Revise and redraft as necessary.
G. Conduct an Adoption Hearing and pass the appropriate regulations.

This process was undertaken in the late 90’s, finalized in September of 2000, and resulted, for the most part, in the land use plan we have today. It was expensive and time consuming. The conflict on the Northfork and the concerns in other areas of the County suggest it is time to reassess the plan and perhaps develop a new or improved set of rules that better recognize the changing demands on the lands of Park County. Though I agree that such a process should be undertaken it would be premature of me to advocate particulars or specific changes at this time. In the course of such a process, my goal would be to develop a plan that would preserve the quality of life Park County offers in the face of the reality that growth is inevitable.

Max Mulford
– The zoning resolution and subdivision regulation needs to be changed to reflect the whole county and not just one area of the county. The regulations and resolution need to address growth, quality of life that we enjoy in Park County and private property rights. While if elected I would be only one vote of five commissioners, I would like to see a committee made up of all areas of the county, with the task of coming up with a zoning and subdivision resolution that addresses all the citizens of the county with rules for development of land and uses thereof. Such rules would spell out when public water systems would be needed per lot size or density of residents. The resolution also needs to be enforceable.

Jill Shockley Siggins – I cannot comment on presentations and petitions I have not read or witnessed. The current board must review current plans/subdivision regulations and adhere legally to the regulations before them. It is up to our elected and appointed officials to ask difficult questions and go to the people to bring about changes in plans and regulations. The land use plans in each planning area reflect the will of the people. These processes are always methodical, meticulous and measured. Some planning areas may require additional planning and review processes before a review of all areas. Advertising public hearings and seeking input from the public are a part of this process and this all takes additional time, input and discussion.

Klodette Stroh – Having served on numerous committees, and boards for the past seventeen years is the basis for my answer to this question. I have served the people of Park County as; National Sugar chairperson and area director for Women Involved In Farm Economics (W.I.F.E), water commissioner for the Shoshone Irrigation District, Policy Council member representing Park County on NOWCAP Policy Council for early education, Buffalo Bill Dam Visitor Center and representing Park County on the Wyoming Water Association (state wide). I have always taken the time to listen to people, thus their concerns has been my voice. Throughout my years of service, I have made sure to answer any letters, phone calls or home visits from people that have trusted me and have given me the honor to serve them. Seventeen years of public service and loyalty to people would not allow me to let any concerns of Park County citizens’ to be unheard especially for over a year (January 2005) as your letter indicates. I don’t understand why P&Z has not acted on the changes and why you have not received a response from them. As I said earlier the people residing in the North Fork area are most familiar with the region, thus changes recommended by the North Fork Organization should be reviewed, discussed and considered. People of North Fork deserve an answer and I am sorry to hear that you have not received a response. I would have to conduct a study of the changes, and the subdivision as well as visit with the North Fork Citizen for Responsible Committee in order to fully understand any necessary changes.

Jim Vanaman
– I need to read them again, it’s been a few years.

Tom Whitson – A new county subdivision regulation plan is in its eighth revision from the Planning and Zoning Board and is under review by the County Commissioners. A number of issues are being addressed and it will be reviewed by the public when the Commission concludes its review.

Question 3 – In spite of the absence of an Assistant Planner, County Planner, and County Engineer over a period of months, Park County continued to approve subdivisions, including major ones, with the County Attorney’s office handling the review. Should the County have declared a moratorium on major subdivisions until the County filled these positions? If the County Attorney’s office has the competency to handle these reviews for months at a time, then do we really need a County Planning office and a County Engineer?

Bill Brewer – I wonder about that, but since I don’t the County Commissioners position, maybe they are feeling the pressure to get it done and have to wait until the three positions are filled.

Kim Capron – The Park County government must be able to function – even in cases of employee turnover or emergencies. It is the responsibility of the County Commissioners to ensure the county employees are cross trained and that capable competent people are serving on county boards and commissions so the day to day functions of the county can continue even in difficult circumstances. I do not think the county should have declared a moratorium on major subdivisions, especially in light of the fact that it has taken so much time to re-hire for the position of County Planner.
My great concern right now is the difficulty Park County is having filling the county planner position. I think it is imperative that we have a well-qualified planner who can lead us through the difficult process of re-vamping the county land use and zoning plans. I hope the County Commissioners don’t settle for a second rate planner just to fill the position.

F. W. Child – We definitely need a County Engineer for roads and bridges. We need a planner, but look for someone who has been in an area that has had growth. If the planner hasn’t been through this, then hire a consultant.

Ed Farmer
– A moratorium would have only accomplished one thing. It would have put a halt to any development within the county, which had the potential to have a significant economic impact county wide. I think a moratorium in this particular case would have sent a message that would have been detrimental to your efforts. (We don’t want anything to happen in Park County until our concerns are addressed.) That would have created a very bad business environment for the commissioners to have to deal with.

Marie Fontaine – In some ways it might be better to declare a moratorium; but the problem is determining the length of time. We have been unable to hire a qualified Planner for $59,000/annually. Deputy County Attorney has been doing a great job, doing his regular job & trying to keep the P&Z projects moving. I can tell you it is taking a toll on Jim. We do need a Planner & probably another Assistant Planner to keep up with the projects & to do enforcement. County Engineer–Mike Collier is moving forward with the projects that are still in the process of when Frank Page was still here so I am unable to fully assess the need.

Terry Hinkle – Current rules require the County Commissioners to name an Acting Planning Coordinator within 45 days of a vacancy in this position. I am not aware of any highly technical, major subdivisions that have been approved by the Acting Planner, so I don’t believe that a moratorium was necessary. The real issue is the consistent enforcement of the zoning regulations.
Obviously, Park County needs and deserves a skilled planning staff and County Engineer to properly administer these complex rules in the long run.

Michael McCue – No, putting approval of major and simple subdivisions on hold should be done on a case-by-case basis. To hold up a subdivision that has gone completely through the process because the Assistant Planner quits would be a bit excessive. Common sense should be used. Yes, we really need a County Engineer and County Planning office.

Max Mulford – I do feel that a Planner and Engineer are needed by the county. The county also needs a compliance or enforcement officer for building and zoning issues. The former Planner clearly and openly stated that enforcement was the last thing for his department to do. Clearly many issues would have been solved by enforcement and clearly states rules and regulations.

Jill Shockley Siggins
– Moratoriums are done only in the case of an emergency. The planning and zoning staff is under the direction of the Country Commissioners. When staff leaves the employment of Park County the board is bound to seek legal council and this is usually sought from the County Attorneys Office. (At times outside council has been sought.) Your question can be answered with a question. If Park County can save revenue by incorporating the planning office into the office of the County Attorney would you support this change? I believe the public would say no. Attorneys have the ability to see if a request has met all of the legal criteria while a planner works with citizens through a process to implement planning criteria through effective planning methodologies. Often the County Engineers office is called upon for the review of subdivision roads, irrigation systems etc. in the planning processes. The landscapes across Park County deserve to have the best minds available in dealing with current and future land use issues.

Klodette Stroh
– Park County citizens have employed experts to assist Park County Commissioners to make wise, beneficial decisions, which effects tax paying citizens who are keeping our schools, hospitals and our neighborhood functional. I have always relied on conducting research, studying background information and looking at every angle as well as considering people’s concerns and advise. I don’t understand how the county was able to approve subdivisions without consulting experts such as County Planner and County Engineer. I would declare a moratorium in absence of information resources. I believe in making a beneficial and accurate decision to serve my people and also alleviate future conflicts that may arise from uneducated decision making.
As you mentioned in your letter, Park County citizens pay for County Planning Office and a County Engineer for their expert advice, and they play a vital role.

Jim Vanaman
– Yes, we need a county planning office and county engineer. We probably should have declared a moratorium on major subdivisions, we need that input from the experts.

Tom Whitson – The county has continued to function in the absence of key personnel including a planner, assistant planner and county engineer. The assistant county attorney has provided excellent assistance and advice during this time and is already a member of the planning team. While an effective planning team is essential, all business cannot stop until the team is fully in place.

Question 4 – What is your position on open space in Park County?

Bill Brewer – I remember a time when you couldn’t divide less than 40 acres in Sunlight. I feel that is too large a parcel, but in Cody County on the North Fork you have quarter acre circles, maybe that’s too small.

Kim Capron – I think open space is often overlooked in our area because we are blessed with so much open space by virtue of our surrounding federal lands. Open spaces need to be incorporated as a component of the overall land use plan for Park County. Beyond those comments I think this needs more discussion that time and space allow in letter format.

F. W. Child
– These areas should be developed for wildlife habitat or whatever is appropriate.

Ed Farmer – At this time I only have one opinion about open space, and I am not sure in what context you use the words “Open space.” Public access to any state or federal ground should not be interfered with by any private property owner, but if my neighbor wants to build a huge building that obstructs my view, granted it would bother me; but I don’t think I have the right, nor does anyone else, to dictate to him what he can or cannot build.

Marie Fontaine – I support open space – I am addressing it mainly in the context of home sites being clustered in a subdivision & open space be included as part of the subdivision. However, the layout of the subdivision is critical. It can look very open & spacious or it can look very cluttered. This is where I think regulations play a “big” part.

Terry Hinkle – Open space is necessary for proper game management – the key to the hunting/outfitting and tourism components of the Park County economy. Protection of open space is reflected in zoning density guidelines and we should remain sensitive to its importance in planning and zoning decisions.

Michael McCue – Open space needs in a County that is by some estimates over 78% public land and conservation reserves is certainly different from open space needs in a mostly urban area. I believe there is a place in our zoning rules for cluster development with dedicated open space. The nature size and location of such spaces are generally embraced in a zoning plan.

Max Mulford – Park County contains more open space than most counties in the United States. By building one or two acre lot subdivisions over larger acreage lot subdivisions, the open space of field or farm land would be used at a slower pace and allow for controlled growth of the county.

Jill Shockley Siggins
– We are fortunate to have 87%percent of all federal and state lands providing spectacular open spaces in Park County. I do favor setting aside additional special places i.e. the North Fork corridor through development rights purchases. I believe the Board of County Commissioners could provide the leadership in seeing these kinds of mechanisms implemented in our county and state. Local governments need to work in harmony with state officials in creating these opportunities for our communities.

Klodette Stroh
– I moved to Wyoming from a metropolitan area thirty years ago and I fell in love with the Park County area so I can certainly understand why people from other areas fall in love with our towns and open spaces. However, I quickly learned the value of open spaces and gained a new respect for people who work hard to preserve it. I myself have been advocating for farmers, ranchers and Wyomingites when it comes to conserving our way of life. People who move here need to be educated on the culture of our area and be willing to be respectful of our way of life, and the rights of citizens that have dedicated their life to take care of this area.

Jim Vanaman
– Again, I need to reread the county zoning. I was on city planning, there 10% open space is the norm. If you are going to have any density on the county level, you need to provide for open space.

Tom Whitson – Open space is a major issue in Park County. While we are fortunate to have federal and state land providing open space, the county should include the concept in any planning.

Question 5 – Do you believe that the current zoning resolution and subdivision regulations are being enforced by Park County?

Bill Brewer – I think this needs to be reviewed. Maybe they need to have stricter enforcement.

Kim Capron
– I think the current zoning and subdivision regulations allowed for flexibility, that the allowable flexibility has been interpreted in a broad way, and is being over-used. In doing so I think current zoning is often being superceded. I’m concerned that “special use” permits are being issued so often that they are not “special” anymore, and I worry that recommendations coming from the county Planning and Zoning board are being second-guessed or ignored.

F. W. Child – I don’t know. If zoning doesn’t prohibit something then it should be ok. You gotta enforce and obey the law as a commissioner, but you should be equal and fair about it. People should be getting together and meeting as a way of resolving some of these problems.

Ed Farmer – By state statute the commissioners are bound by law to uphold the current zoning resolutions and subdivision regulations. They are allowed to grant conditional variances but not without some time consuming investigation. I am certain that they have done nothing illegal and use their best judgment with the advice of council to aid them in that process. If for any reason someone suspects that the commission has acted outside the parameters of the law, the State Attorney General would be the next logical choice to seek a court ordered injunction against any decision they make.

Marie Fontaine – Not as they should be. This is why I think another Assistant Planner could do enforcement plus some of the P&Z projects.

Terry Hinkle – There is room for improvement in this area. I believe the difficulties we are currently experiencing in planning and zoning involve problems with enforcement and interpretation of these regulations, rather than major deficiencies in the regulations themselves.

Michael McCue – No, the Planning and Zoning office by their own admission is unable to enforce all zoning and subdivision regulations in the County. They simply do not have the staff required to police the entire County. Is that right? No. Again, hiring and retaining the right personnel and an adequate number of professionally trained personnel is critical to solving this problem. A major consideration that Commissioners must weigh in any activity requested by voters is the cost. Cost is about budgeting and budgeting is dependent on taxation. We are a very conservative county with many voters who decry taxation. I continually hear comments about the importance of property rights and complaints about increasing taxes. Therefore, it is a balancing act between what the public wants, what it costs and what they are willing to pay for as a taxpayer. In the past, the Commissioners have not been willing to tax the citizens for zoning enforcement personnel. I am open to considering it because without it the effort and expense to zone in the first place is seriously compromised. It would require several additional personnel in the Planning and Zoning Office and perhaps additional personnel in the County Attorney’s office. That would be a significant new increase to the budget that would have to be addressed in light of the multitude of other demands being made on the county financial resources.

I am dedicated to the rational development of Park County. Growth in Park County is inevitable but the deterioration of our quality of life is not.

Max Mulford – While I’m not an attorney, it appears to me that the county is in violation of its own resolution and has little desire to enforce it unless it is challenged by the public.

Jill Shockley Siggins – When the issues are brought before the County they are enforced.  I believe there are people in the county whom ask for forgiveness rather than getting the necessary permits and paperwork before beginning projects.   When these issues are brought before the Planning and Zoning Commission they are resolved according to the current regulations. Subdivisions covenants are the responsibility of subdivision enforcement.  Many times neighbors are not interested in confronting neighbors regarding the subdivision covenants and problems arise within neighborhoods.

Klodette Stroh –  I believe in enforcing the same resolution for every one. We are all Park County citizens and we all pay taxes. I am loyal to taxpayers and protect their rights. I believe in equality and as a public servant, I have made sure none of my people’s rights have been stepped on.

Jim Vanaman
– One would hope the county attorney is ensuring that the County Commissioners and Planning and Zoning Board are following them.  Once again, I would need to review the documents.

Tom Whitson – Enforcement of zoning regulations is an important issue in Park County, but unfortunately is very dependent on resources available.

END

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